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  • Entrepreneurship Dynamics in Morocco Gem 2015 National Report

    Mar 05, 2017
    This national report discusses the key aspects of entrepreneurship dynamics in Morocco based on the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor Survey conducted in 2015.
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  • IFAD Rural Youth Economic Empowerment Program

    Oct 30, 2013
    This project overview explains the IFAD Rural Youth Economic Employment Program, which aims to increase the employment and self-employment of youth aged 15-35 in Morocco, Tunisia, Yemen and Egypt by 2016. Rural poverty is endemic in most of the Middle East and North African countries and youth are one of the groups that suffer most – unemployed rural youth have one of the highest incidences of poverty of all groups in MENA. There are many drivers for youth unemployment, including training and labor market mismatch, lack of social and business networks for youth, a bias toward government jobs over private sector jobs and self-employment, inadequate employability and entrepreneurship skills, and insufficient access to and use of appropriate financial services and capabilities. These last two constraints to successful employment – inadequate employability and entrepreneurial skills and insufficient access to and use of appropriate financial services and capabilities - are the focus of a partnership between Making Cents International, the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and Silatech. Together, we will test innovative models in Morocco, Tunisia, Yemen and Egypt in the “IFAD Rural Youth Economic Empowerment Program” that have potential for scale up and sustainability. In the process, the program aims to increase the employment and self-employment of youth aged 15-35 by 2016.
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  • Al-Amal EU Dialogue

    Feb 28, 2013
    This publication is a set of examples of promising youth financial inclusion programs from around the world. It outlines and compares the lessons emerging from them. The purpose of this publication is to contribute to the microfinance sector’s collective knowledge base by sharing examples of promising youth financial inclusion programs around the world and the lessons emerging from them. By sharing case studies that illustrate a variety of service combinations, approaches and delivery models, the European Microfinance Platform (e-MFP) seeks to provide the reader with useful reference points for offering savings, credit and non-financial services (especially training and mentoring) to youth. The following examples have been selected not to make a case for a particular approach and not necessarily because the organizations have the right formula – in most cases the products and initiatives are too recent for conclusions to be drawn about their long-term sustainability and demonstrable impact on youth lives and livelihoods. But members of the e MFP Financial Inclusion Action Group believe these cases offer valuable lessons learned and experiences to consider as the practice of youth financial inclusion expands and evolves.
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  • Kingdom Of Morocco: Promoting Youth Opportunities And Participation

    Jun 20, 2012
    Prepared just prior to the Arab Spring, this report anticipates the demands for social and economic inclusion articulated by Moroccan young people especially following February 2011. Since then, these demands have been amplified and reached a new level of urgency. This study adopts a mixed method approach combining an innovative quantitative instrument with qualitative and institutional analysis. The goal is to provide policy makers with a nuanced analysis of barriers to employment and active civic participation encountered by young people aged 15 to 29 years so as to tailor youth interventions more effectively. It identifies a wide range of recommendations available to support youth-inclusive activities and policies, and a roadmap for integrated youth investments. This report was produced by the World Bank and financed by Silatech. The full report can be accessed here.
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  • Engineering Local Jobs: Electromechanical Trades In Morocco

    Jan 31, 2011
    This discussion paper highlights areas where strategic investment in Morocco is likely to create jobs and have strong economic returns. Specifically, it focuses on targeted investment that would ease the burden on industry growth by producing resources currently imported from outside of Morocco. Morocco is keenly aware and proactively pursuing most of the areas where gaps in its economy exist. However, one area of opportunity is developing skilled human capital—many Moroccan industries have sought to make up for this shortage by importing skilled workers; other industries have not and are suffering as a result. Although Morocco has a large labor supply, much of it is unskilled. Moreover, for those with skills, there are often structural barriers to enter the workforce. Across the economy, expertise is brought in from outside of the country, but nowhere is this more evident than in engineering. In this study, we look at engineers and workers in electro-mechanical trades, which provide much of the work necessary to support newly built infrastructure. These occupation clusters are important to the economy and are promising targets for investments in training. In particular, electro-mechanical trades represent a short-term goal for people looking for work, while also being a first step toward a long-term goal of full engineering training because of a common base level of skills. Successes and Challenges In many ways, Morocco has been a recent economic development success story. The government has spearheaded corporate privatization and financial reforms, signed free trade agreements, created world-class seaports, aided the modernization of existing industries, expanded modern infrastructure, marketed and provided opportunities for offshoring, helped establish Morocco as a top global tourist destination, and encouraged a well-educated population. As a result of these investments and other reforms, Morocco has expanded output and seen an increase in employment in recent decades. However, the nation faces some challenges: High government debt Individual tax rates of 40% on those earning more than US $1550 per month High population growth Very low employment-to-population ratio of 46% Urban youth unemployment estimated as high as 33% In addition, key sectors of the economy remain susceptible to outside forces: The agricultural sector accounts for approximately 45% of total employment but only 15% of GDP. In years with scant rainfall, GDP falls anywhere from 1% to 6%. In years of bumper crops, GDP increases by 1% to 4%. Tourism is expanding with construction of several high-end coastal resorts, but the sector has also been hit hard by economic downturns and creates low-skill, low-wage jobs. Morocco is the largest exporter of phosphorous and allied chemicals in the world, an activity which accounts for approximately 12% of all exports. The nation imports nearly 90% of its annual energy needs. The industrial sector accounts for 30% of GDP but only 20% of the workforce. Focus on High and Middle Skills Low-skill workers are not considered in this report because from an industry perspective they are the easiest workers to hire. Middle- and high-skill workers are much harder to come by because they need to have specific skills that are not in large supply. With low-skill workers, an efficient worker may be twice as productive as an inefficient one, but with middle- and high-skill workers, efficient workers may be five or ten times more productive. Industry success relies on the smaller group of skilled workers performing their jobs well, which drives the output of the industry as a whole. When industries cannot find high-quality workers, they have three options: a) import labor, b) hire workers of lesser quality who will hurt performance, or c) not hire at all. Industries in this position also will have fewer low-skill workers, as industry growth and capacity are directly impacted by a lack of skilled workers. Lifting constraints, then, on middle- and high-skill workers opens doors for low-skill workers.
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Engineering Local Jobs: Electromechanical Trades In Morocco

ENTREPRENEURSHIP DYNAMICS IN MOROCCO: GEM 2015 NATIONAL REPORT

This national report discusses the key aspects of entrepreneurship dynamics in Morocco based on the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor Survey conducted in 2015.

(more…)

IFAD RURAL YOUTH ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT PROGRAM

This project overview explains the IFAD Rural Youth Economic Employment Program, which aims to increase the employment and self-employment of youth aged 15-35 in Morocco, Tunisia, Yemen and Egypt by 2016.

(more…)

AL-AMAL EU DIALOGUE

This publication is a set of examples of promising youth financial inclusion programs from around the world. It outlines and compares the lessons emerging from them.

(more…)

KINGDOM OF MOROCCO: PROMOTING YOUTH OPPORTUNITIES AND PARTICIPATION

Prepared just prior to the Arab Spring, this report anticipates the demands for social and economic inclusion articulated by Moroccan young people especially following February 2011.

(more…)

ENGINEERING LOCAL JOBS: ELECTROMECHANICAL TRADES IN MOROCCO

This discussion paper highlights areas where strategic investment in Morocco is likely to create jobs and have strong economic returns.

(more…)